Our History

Our History

For over 40 years, Stolt Sea Farm has been an innovator and a leader in the development of sustainable, environmentally friendly aquaculture.

 

2015

  •  Stolt Sea Farm’s facility in Iceland begins producing commercial volumes of sole.

2014

  •  Stolt Sea Farm moves its headquarters to Santiago de Compostela (La Coruña, Spain).
  •  SSF announces plans to develop a worldwide sales network for Sterling Caviar, the brand name for SSF’s sustainable sturgeon farming and caviar unit.

2013

  •  First sole juveniles delivered from Spanish hatcheries to SSF’s new sole farm in Iceland.

2012

  • Stolt Sea Farm acquires Acuidoro, a turbot farm, and Alrogal, a flatfish hatchery in Spain. This purchase raises SSF’s turbot production capacity to 5,400 tonnes per year.
  • Stolt Sea Farm begins construction of the Hafnir, Iceland sole farm, which will increase sole production to over 800 tonnes per year.

2011

  •  Stolt Sea Farm reaches agreement with HS Orka hf in Iceland, allowing SSF to lease land and water from HS Orka's Reykjanes geothermal power plant for the purpose of establishing and operating a large-scale sole farm.

2010

  • Stolt Sea Farm's sole farm in Anglet, France achieves its planned production capacity of 350 tonnes.
  • SSF’s sole is now marketed in Europe, Russia and the U.S.

2009

  • Stolt Sea Farm begins producing sole in Anglet, France, with estimated production of 300 tonnes in 2010.

2007

  • Annual turbot production reaches 4,000 tonnes.

2006

  • Stolt Sea Farm acquires leading US caviar production company, Sterling Caviar LLC.
  • The company divests its Marine Harvest holdings and its Australian tuna operations to concentrate on species cultivated on land – turbot, sole and sturgeon – that have strong growth prospects.

2005

  • Stolt Sea Farm continues to produce sole, turbot and tuna, with production centres in Australia, France and Portugal and with headquarters in Lira Carnota, La Coruña, Spain.
  • Stolt Sea Farm opens the world’s largest fish farm in Cape Vilán-Camariñas, Spain, focusing on marine flatfish and representing an investment of €17 million.

2004

  • Stolt-Nielsen S.A. and Nutreco Holding, B.V. agree to merge most of their marine cultivation and production activities for cod, sturgeon, halibut, salmon, tilapia and marine trout. The move leads to the creation of the world’s leading aquaculture company, Marine Harvest.
  • Research and development focuses on developing new products by investigating sole farming in Spain and cod in Norway. The company now has the widest range of marine species in production – cod, sturgeon, halibut, tuna, sole, turbot, salmon, tilapia and marine trout.

2000

  • Specialist fish smoking and processing company La Couronne, in Belgium, becomes part of the Stolt group.
  • Stolt Sea Farm acquires Australian Bluefin Pty Ltd. and commences tuna farming.

1999

  • Stolt Sea Farm opens the largest turbot production farm in the world in Lira (Carnota). The company’s production capacity for Prodemar™ turbot surpasses 2,000 tonnes.

1992-1998

  • Stolt Sea Farm concentrates on producing Prodemar™ turbot with the acquisition of one farm in Portugal and several in Galicia (Spain). Production capacity rises to 1,200 tonnes per year.
  • Further investment is made into salmon farming; acquisitions are made in Chile and production begins in Scotland.
  • Stolt Sea Farm establishes commercial units in the Far East.

1983-1991

  • As part of the company’s diversification programme, the group acquired marine hatcheries in Spain and France.
  • The company becomes the European leader for the production of clam and oyster seed, prawn postlarvae as well as turbot, gilthead sea bream and sea bass juveniles.
  • Stolt Sea Farm begins to produce salmon in the US, Canada and Norway through the acquisition of several farms. In Norway SSF also begins producing turbot and investigating the farming of halibut. Sturgeon production begins in California.

1972

  • Stolt Sea Farm A/S is established in Norway and soon becomes the leading supplier of juvenile salmon in the emerging salmon industry.